Holistic WOF

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We have all heard the importance of seeing a GP on a yearly basis to get a basic health WOF.  Blood pressure, cholesterol, BMI, annual skin check, booster shots and cancer screening.  These are all very important but wait, there is more…

A great place to learn more about what you need for a WOF can be found here: http://liveto100.everybody.co.nz/personal-wof.  This website is a free resource designed for New Zealand residents on general health and wellness.

However, one area often overlooked when it comes to the annual health check is posture, flexibility and strength.  The human body loses approximately two percent of strength per year and up to five percent of its flexibility.

Posture is a constant battle that we must always deal with.  From the age of five, we are crammed into desks, cars, chairs and many other sustained poor postures.

The human body was designed to move and when it spends up to eight hours behind a desk; muscles will atrophy and tendons will shrink.

Poor trunk flexibility has been shown to lead to arterial stiffness, which is a risk factor to higher mortality rates.

A tight restricted body is not able to function at an optimal level. This leads to reduced circulation and poor nutrient supply to the joints, tendons, and ligaments.  We see this daily in the clinic.

Living with niggles, tightness, headaches and general aches and pains is a warning sign that the body isn’t moving freely and you are missing out on optimal health.
A key component in the pain to performance model is to understand the importance of functional movement and how it prevents injury and increases the quality and longevity of life.  Efficient movement is the foundation of performance.

Whatever exercise, sport or hobbies you take part in; movement patterns affect your performance. The first step to improving your performance is to identify movement dysfunction.

The brain understands patterns. Once you recognize how your body moves, you can re-train its patterns. Your muscles and joints should work together in fluid and efficient movement.

Do you know what you truly need to work on to develop this movement?  You are only as strong as your weakest link.

The functional movement screen is a simple test of seven movements, designed to identify your ability to perform pain free, fluid and efficient movement. Below is a simple self test you can do at home.  Each exercise has a picture of the correct position and a comparison picture of a poor position.

If you have trouble with any of the moves you can get a proper FMS screen by Hayden Garrett, the only certified FMS provider in Hamilton, at Advance Physio.

1. Deep Squat Hold a dowel overhead as pictured. Feet are shoulder width apart and straight forward. Squat down. It’s cheating if your knees come together, or if your hands go ahead of your knees.

1. Deep Squat Hold a dowel overhead as pictured. Feet are shoulder width apart and straight forward. Squat down. It’s cheating if your knees come together, or if your hands go ahead of your knees.

2. Inline lunge Stand on a line or board. Lunge without falling over as pictured below. Stay as upright as possible.

2. Inline lunge Stand on a line or board. Lunge without falling over as pictured below. Stay as upright as possible.

3. Hurdle step Measure a string to just below your knee. With dowel on your shoulders step over, tap the ground and return without touching the string. How balanced are you?

3. Hurdle step Measure a string to just below your knee. With dowel on your shoulders step over, tap the ground and return without touching the string. How balanced are you?

4. Shoulder mobility Can you reach your fingers behind your back? Try both sides. Are they the same?

4. Shoulder mobility Can you reach your fingers behind your back? Try both sides. Are they the same?

5. Active straight leg raise Lie flat on your back and raise one leg without bending your knee. How high can you go?

5. Active straight leg raise Lie flat on your back and raise one leg without bending your knee. How high can you go?

6. Trunk stability push-up Can you do a standard push-up?

6. Trunk stability push-up Can you do a standard push-up?

7. Core stability test Kneel on all fours. Can you lift the same side arm and leg or do you fall over?

7. Core stability test Kneel on all fours. Can you lift the same side arm and leg or do you fall over?

If you want to perform better, move easier and live a more active life, each of the above movements should be relatively easy to perform.  If not, you might have some work to do over the holidays. www.advancephysio.co.nz

 

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